15 July 2013 ~ 0 Comments

ICWSM 2013 Report

The second half of the year, for me, is conference time. This year is no exception and, after enjoying NetSci in June, this month I went to ICWSM: International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media. Those who think little of me (not many, just because nobody knows me) would say that I went there just because it was organized close to home. It’s the first conference for which I travel not via plane, but via bike (and lovin’ it). But those people are just haters: I was there because I had a glorious paper, the one about internet memes I wrote about a couple of months ago.

In any case, let’s try to not be so self-centered now (good joke to read in a personal website, with my name in the URL, talking about my work). The first awesome thing coming to my mind are the two very good keynotes. The first one, by David Lazer, was about bridging the gap between social scientists and computer scientists, which is one of the aims of the conference itself. Actually, I have been overwhelmed by the amount of the good work presented by David, not being able to properly digest the message. I was struck with awe by the ability of his team to get great insights from any source of data about politics and society (one among the great works was about who and how people contact other people after a shock, like the recent Boston bombings).

For the second keynote, the names speak for themselves: Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg. They are the creators of ManyEyes, an awesome website where you can upload your data, in almost any form, and visualize it with many easy-to-use tools. They constantly do a great job in infographics, data visualization and scientific design. They had a very easy time pleasing the audience with examples of their works: from the older visualizations of Wikipedia activities to the more recent wind maps that I am including below because they are just mesmerizing (they are also on the cover of an awesome book about data visualization by Isabel Meirelles). Talks like this are the best way to convince you of the importance of a good communication in every aspect of your work, whether it is scientific or not.

As you know, I was there to present my work about internet memes, trying to prove that they indeed are proper memes and they are characterized by competition, collaboration, high-order organization and, maybe I’ll be able to prove in the future, mutation and evolution. I knew I was not alone in this and I had the pleasure to meet Christian Bauckhage, who shares with me an interest in the subject and a scientific approach to it. His presentation was a follow-up to his 2011 paper and provides even more insights about how we can model the life-span of an internet meme. Too bad we are up against a very influential person, who recently stated his skepticism about internet memes. Or maybe he didn’t, as the second half of his talk seems to contradict part of the first, and his message goes a bit deeper:

Other great works from the first day include a great insight about how families relate to each other on Facebook, from Adamic’s group. Alice Marwick also treated us to a sociological dive into the world of fashion bloggers, in the search of the value and the meaning of authenticity in this community. But I have to say that my personal award for the best presentation of the conference goes to “The Secret Life of Online Moms” by Sarita Yardi Schoenebeck. It is a hilarious exploration of YouBeMom, a discussion platform where moms can discuss with each other preserving their complete anonymity. It is basically a 4chan for moms. For those who know 4chan, I mean that literally. For those who don’t, you can do on of two things to understand it: taking a look or just watching this extract from 30 Rock, that is even too vanilla in representing the reality:

I also really liked the statistical study about emoticon usage in Twitter across different cultures, by Meeyoung Cha‘s team. Apparently, horizontal emoticons with a mouth, like “:)”, are very Western, while vertical emoticons without a mouth are very Eastern (like “.\/.”, one of my personal favorites, seen in a South Korean movie). Is it possible that this is a cultural trait due to different face recognition routines of Western and Eastern people? Sadly, the Western emoticon variation that includes a nose “:-)”, and that I particularly like to use, apparently is correlated with age. I’m an old person thrown in a world where young people are so impatient that they can’t lose time pressing a single key to give a nose to their emoticons :(

My other personal honorable mention goes to Morstatter et al.’s work. These guys had the privilege to access the Twitter Firehouse APIs, granting them the possibility of analyzing the entire Twitter stream. After that, they crawled Twitter using also the free public APIs, which give access to 1% of all Twitter streams. They shown that the sampling of this 1% is not random, is not representative, is not anything. Therefore, all studies that involve data gathering through the public APIs have to focus on phenomena that include less than 1% of the tweets (because in that case even the public APIs return all results), otherwise the results are doomed to be greatly biased.

Workshops and tutorials, held after the conference, were very interesting too. Particularly one, I have to say: Multiple Network Models. Sounds familiar? That would be because it is the tutorial version of the satellite I did with Matteo Magnani. Luca Rossi and others at NetSci. Uooops! This time I am not to blame, I swear! Matteo and Luca organized the thing all by themselves and they did a great job in explaining details about how to deal with these monstrous multiple networks, just like I did in an older post here.

I think this sums up pretty much my best-of-the-best picks from a very interesting conference. Looking forward to trying to be there also next year!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

HTML tags are not allowed.